Gawler Ranges National Park: Volcanic Structures and Unique Wildlife

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Gawler Ranges National Park in South Australia, is about 600 km northwest of Adelaide. The park was established on 25 January 2002.

Covering 163,340 hectares, the park is known for its ancient organ-pipe volcanic rock formations  These dramatic structures result from volcanic eruptions that occurred over 1500 million years ago. There are stun­ning rocky out­crops at Yandin­ga Falls and Kolay Mir­i­ca Falls.

The park hosts a wide variety of flora and fauna including kangaroos, emus, and various plant species such as acacias and eucalypts. The land­scape pro­tects a number of rare and threat­ened plants and ani­mals, includ­ing crim­son mallee and the yel­low-foot­ed rock-wallaby.

“The Gawler Ranges Peo­ple are recog­nised as the tra­di­tion­al own­ers of this Coun­try, attain­ing native title in 2011. The Gawler Ranges peo­ple are a dis­tinct group of foun­da­tion fam­i­lies made up of some, but not all, the Barn­gar­la, Kokatha and Wiran­gu Peo­ple.” (source: Parks SA). The Gawler Range People have Native title over 3.5 million hectares of the Gawler Ranges since 2011 (source Adelaide Now)

For more detailed information on planning your visit, check out the official South Australian National Parks website. Camping options are available.

Check out more of Australia’s amazing National Parks

Gawler National Park
Species of Gawler National Park – courtesy of INaturalist

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