Munga-Thirri Simpson Desert National Park: World’s Largest Sand Dune Desert

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Munga-Thirri Simpson Desert National Park in Australia is the world’s largest sand dune desert. Situated in South Australia’s far north, it stretches over 6.25 million hectares across three states. Accessible via 4WD from Oodnadatta, Birdsville, or Mt. Dare, it’s marked by mesmerizing red sand dunes, arid vegetation, and occasional salt lakes that bloom with wildflowers after rains.

Established in 2011, the park holds significant Indigenous cultural value, being the land of the Wangkangurru-Yarluyandi people. It’s a refuge for various desert-adapted flora and fauna, including the endangered night parrot and over 180 flower species. Visitors can enjoy 4WD desert crossing, birdwatching, photography, and stargazing in the clear desert sky.

The ecoregion has a recorded 34 native mammals, 231 birds, 22 amphibians, 13 fish, and 125 reptile species. “Endemic species include the grey grasswren (Amytornis barbatus) and the kowari (Dasycercus byrnei), a small, tuft-tailed marsupial predator. Thirteen plants and many reptile species are endemic. Dunnarts, bilby, mulgara and kowari, ampurta, dingos, and other fauna tend to be nocturnal to escape the heat.” (source OneEarth.org)

For more information, check out the official South Australian National Parks website.

Check out more of Australia’s amazing National Parks

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